Survey of British Columbians: Reflecting on a Year of COVID-19

From March 3-8, 2021, on behalf of Postmedia, Leger conducted an online survey among British Columbians to explore their reflections on living through a year of COVID-19, more specifically, their:

  • Feelings about COVID-19, compared to 2020
  • Reflections on 2021
  • Art, film, music, and sports experiences during COVID-19
  • Support for leaders

SOME OF THE KEY FINDINGS OF OUR SURVEY INCLUDE…

  • British Columbians are missing social connections: there has been an 8-point increase in those feeling increased feelings of depression, anxiety, loneliness, or isolation (42% vs. 34% in March 2020), as well as a 14-point decrease in making positive connections with friends and family outside their household (27% vs. 41% in March 2020).
  • Six-in-ten (61%) British Columbians report feeling fatigued or burnt out from living during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Thinking back to the start of the pandemic, 64% of British Columbians wish the government had enforced restrictions more, and 59% wish there were stricter restrictions (59%).
  • Half (53%) of British Columbians feel they could have improved their physical health by exercising or eating healthier during the pandemic.
  • Almost half of British Columbians (46%) discovered new movies and music during the pandemic, and 24% experienced a virtual concert.
  • Half (47%) of British Columbians find the experience of watching live sports different during the pandemic, while two-in-ten (19%) experienced no change.

SURVEY METHODOLOGY

  • 1,002 residents of British Columbia aged 18 or older were surveyed online using Leger’s online panel, LEO, from March 3-8, 2021.
  • Using data from the 2016 Census, the results were weighted according to age, gender, and region in order to ensure a representative sample of the population in British Columbia.
  • No margin of error can be associated with a non-probability sample. However, for comparative purposes, a probability sample of 1,002 respondents would have a margin of error of ±3.1%, 19 times out of 20.

DOWNLOAD OUR FULL REPORT BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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