The Rebirth of Social Media: Digital Platforms During Times of Crisis: A Leger Webinar

DOWNLOAD OUR 4 SUGGESTIONS FOR SOCIAL MEDIA DURING THE COVID-19 CRISIS FOR A SUMMARY OF THE HIGHLIGHTS AND A LINK TO (RE)WATCH THE WEBINAR AT THE END OF THIS ARTICLE

The spread of the global COVID-19 pandemic has forced companies and brands to innovate rapidly to stay relevant. How companies manage their relationships and communicate with their stakeholders during this period of crisis will determine whether they are able to successfully adapt and stay afloat in a world that seems to change on a daily basis.

With this in mind, Leger has launched a series of webinars focused on communications in times of crisis. Our goal is to provide you with information that will assist you with navigating these uncertain times. Each webinar features a short introduction, followed by a 30-minute question and answer session.

In our May 7 webinar, special guest Dr. Alex Sévigny, PhD; APR; Director, MCM Research Lab; Associate Professor,  Master of Communications Management, McMaster Universitydiscussed how social media is a critical tool during this pandemic, especially when it comes to helping physically isolated people maintain their connections with each other. He also outlined our latest (April 2020) findings on social media, and compared them to Leger and McMaster University’s 10-year longitudinal study: The Social Media Reality Check.


The Social Media Reality Check is an 11-year longitudinal study, conducted by Leger and McMaster University, which focuses on analyzing how Canadians use social media. The latest findings (April 2020) reveal that generally, the numbers are down: people are using fewer social media platforms, and when they are using social media has changed compared to the last time we collected data (about a year or so ago). Why is that? 

Our usual use of social media is structured by our lives.

We use it when we have a few free minutes to distract ourselves, for example, during our commute, on an afternoon break, before bed, etc. These are not intentional uses: they’re structured by our daily agenda.  

Now, we’re seeing a shift toward more intentional usage of social media: people are using it less frequently, but when they do, they are looking at it because they want to. As a result, our communications with other people through social media have become more intentional as well.  


Interested in attending other webinars in this series? Click here to learn more and register.

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